"I walk around the school hallways and look at the people. I look at the teachers and wonder why they’re here. If they like their jobs. Or us. And I wonder how smart they were when they were fifteen. Not in a mean way. In a curious way. It’s like looking at all the students and wondering who’s had their heart broken that day, and how they are able to cope with having three quizzes and a book report due on top of that. Or wondering who did the heart breaking. And wondering why."

Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower (via observando)

curlymoroccan:

positivehardcore:

zenalien:

illumnus:

unlovde:

tardis-are-y0u-drunk-again:

fairytalefaker:

Do you know the horrors that happened where you’re standing?

Life goes on, strange isn’t it?

goosebumps

This is so chilling but fascinating

These were just too intriguing to not reblog

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i stood where hitler stood

  • me in other people's showers: what the fuck is going on

daniellaaxox:

Coac(hella expensive)

Coac(hella far away)

Coac(hella wish I could go)

What if one of the most important street photographers of the 20th century was a 1950s children’s nanny who kept herself to herself and never showed a single one of her photographs to anyone?

Decades later in 2007, a Chicago real estate agent and historical hobbyist, John Maloof purchased a box of never-seen, never-developed film negatives of an unknown ‘amateur’ photographer for $380 at his local auction house.

John began developing his new collection of photographs, some 100,000 negatives in total, that had been abandoned in a storage locker in Chicago before they ended up at the auction house. It became clear these were no ordinary street snaps of 1950s & 60s Chicago and New York and so John embarked on a journey to find out who was behind the photographs and soon discovered her name: Vivien Maier.

More here